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Stranger Reads November 2, 2017

Filed under: Books,Uncategorized — Heather @ 9:59 pm
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stranger reads

Are you obsessed with Netflix’s Stranger Things? Well, we are too! Here are some stranger reads to fill the time between binge watching…

Try these, for younger readers…

 

The Babysitter’s Guide to Monster Hunting by Joe Ballerini

Disappointed babysitter. Check. Missing kid. Check. Baseball bat just in case. Check. Who knew there was a secret society of monster hunting babysitters? Not Kelly – and now she’s one of them!

babysitter's guide cover

Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Coraline moves into a creepy new house and finds a secret passage to an alternate version of her reality. Practically perfect, except for the fact that everyone has button eyes. Neil Gaiman is the master of a creepy tale and this one is perfect for the youngest fans of Stranger Things. 

coraline cover

The Jumbies by Tracey Bapiste

Jumbies are real, right? That’s what Corinne assumes until she follows one into the forest. Now there’s a mysterious stranger in her own house, possibly bewitching her father. Does Corinne possess the magic necessary to save the world?

jumbies cover

Fuzzy Mud by Louis Sachar

Master of comedy, Louis Sachar, takes a darker turn with this tale about a biological contagion right next to a middle school. Sound familiar? BFFs Tamaya and Marshall team up with bully Chad to find a solution.

fuzzy mud cover

The Last Kids on Earth by Max Brailler

This one’s a graphic novel – and a series! Described as Diary of a Wimpy Kid meets The Walking Dead. Follow Jack and his band of misfits as they save the world.

last kids on earth cover

For middle grade readers and beyond…

The Riverman by Aaron Starmer.

Alistair thinks his neighbor Fiona must be crazy when she tells him there’s a portal to another world in her basement. Guess who lives there and want to steal the souls of children? The Riverman! Fans of Stephen King’s It looking for a more gentle read will devour this trilogy…unless the Riverman does first.

 

riverman cover

The Nest by Kenneth Oppel

In hopes of saving his sick baby brother Steve makes a deal with the wasp queen while dreaming. What could go wrong, right? Truly the stuff of nightmares, this one is not for the faint of heart!

nest cover

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

Time travel. A mysterious island. Children with various gifts. This tale is spooky and sweet at the same time. Beautifully chilling black and white photographs add to the creep factor.

miss peregrine cover

Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury

Bradbury’s classic tale about a mysterious and perhaps evil carnival arriving in town continues to haunt and enchant generations of readers.

something wicked cover

For more mature readers…

Replica by Lauren Oliver

A flip book told by dual narrators Gemma and Lyra. Lyra, aka 24, has escaped from a mysterious research facility with another boy, 72. Gemma’s life turns upside down when searching for answers she may not be ready to hear. Super cool format and visually stunning cover add to this story.

replica cover

Paper Girls by Brian K. Vaughn

A graphic novel for the older crowd, Paper Girls follows four teenage girls on bikes in the late 80s as they try to save the world from invasion on Halloween.

paper girls cover

The Boy Who Drew Monsters by Keith Donohue

Jack hasn’t been the same since he almost drowned three years ago. Now he’s drawing monsters that may or may not be coming to life. His family unravels as this thrilling tale evolves.

boy who drew monsters cover

Basically anything by the master of horror and suspense, Stephen King. Try It, Firestarter, Carrie, or any of his short story collections for a real scare.

stephen king books

 

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Holiday Reads for Cold Nights December 16, 2016

Filed under: Books,Uncategorized — Heather @ 10:09 pm
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Here are some suggestions for when you want to escape the madness of the holidays or just snuggle up with a good book. Unfortunately, there is a serious lack of Hanukkah and Kwanzaa books for YA readers. For those of you looking for a Christmas read, here are some titles to keep you this holiday season.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

This classic has stood the test of time. Read the original story that has influenced pop culture for well over one hundred and sixty years.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Another classic, this story begins at Christmas during the Civil War. Get to know the March sisters all over again.

Skipping Christmas by John Grisham

A cute story about a family’s last minute scramble to plan the perfect holiday. This book has been made into the popular film, Christmas with the Kranks. 

Murder for Christmas: 26 Tales of Seasonal Malice edited by Thomas Godfrey

For the mystery lover, here’s a collection of short stories sure to make the holidays extra creepy. Famous authors like Agatha Christie, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Charles Dickens are represented in their holiday finest.

Decked with Holly by Marni Bates

Fans of Bates’ Smith High series will delight in this light romance set aboard a cruise ship. Perfect holiday reading!

What Light by Jay Asher

The reviews keep rolling in for this 2016 title from the author of the YA modern classic, Thirteen Reasons Why. Travel to a Christmas tree farm in Oregon for a story of redemption and hope.

The Twelve Days of Dash and Lily by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan

The dynamic duo of YA fiction is back with two of our favorite friends, Dashiell and Lily. We met them five years ago when a chance discovery led them on an epic chase across NYC. Now they’re back one year after the events that brought them together.

My True Love Gave to Me: Twelve Holiday Stories edited by Stephanie Perkins

A who’s who of YA fiction authors feature short stories realistic and fantastic alike. There’s something for everyone in this compilation.

Let it Snow: Three Holiday Romances by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle

Three interconnected stories from three of the best in YA fiction. It’s Christmas eve and romance isn’t only under the mistletoe, it could be at the Waffle House!

 

YALSA 2016 Teens’ Top Ten December 14, 2016

Filed under: Books,Uncategorized — Heather @ 6:54 pm
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It’s that time of year again – time for the YALSA Teens’ Top Ten list – a “teen choice” list of the favorite books of the year. Check out the website:  www.ala.org/yalsa/teenstopten

  1. Alive by Chandler Baker

“Stella Cross has received a heart transplant, but it has not stopped her emotional suffering. Then a mysterious boy named Levi Zin comes into her life. Stella’s pain goes away whenever she’s around Levi. However, Stella finds out a terrible secret about Levi. Can it be true?”

2. All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

” Death plays a big role in the lives of high schoolers Theodore Finch and Violet Markey. He is constantly on the verge of suicide, and she is battling grief after he sister’s death. The Indiana teens come together to work on a project and soon develop a bond, showing each other what it’s like to live.”

3. The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough

” Set in Seattle in the 1920s, a romance develops between Flora, who is African American, and Henry, who is white. Despite some differences, the pair has much in common, including a shared love of jazz music. However, it turns out that Flora and Henry actually are pawns in a game played by two other characters – Love and Death. This book is full of intrigue, and is, at times, heartbreaking, and will have the reader racing to the final pages.”

4. Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

” Young criminal genius Kaz Brekker is offered the chance to pull off a dangerous theft that can make him rich. He recruits a gang of six dangerous misfits to help him with the heist. The book follows the crew’s crazy adventure and features plot twists, betrayals, and schemes aplenty.”

5. Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

“Maddy is a teenager with a serious autoimmune disease that prevents her from leaving the house. Yet, she seems content to stay home and read books. That is until a boy named Olly moves in next door. The two meet, and their quirky relationship is chronicled through emails, journal entries, IMs and old notes.”

6. Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone

“Samantha McAllister seems to have it all: she is beautiful, bright and part of the popular crowd in high school. But looks can be deceiving, and she is hiding the fact she has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Samantha’s life changes after she visits a place at school called Poet’s Corner and she beings hanging out with new friends like Caroline and AJ.”

7. The Novice: Summoner: Book One by Taran Matharu

“A blacksmith’s apprentice named Fletcher discovers he can summon demons from another world. He soon gets chased out of his village for a crime he did not commit, ending up at an academy for adepts, where he is trained to serve as a Battlemage in the Empire’s war against the savage Orcs. Eventually, Fletcher discovers the fate of the Empire is in his hands.”

8. Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

“Kady and Ezra have just broken up, and then their planet is bombed by a megacorporation. The pair escapes to a government ship, but must put their differences aside in order to survive and stop a plague that has resulted from the use of a bioweapon.”

9. When by Victoria Laurie

“High school junior Maddie Fynn has special powers that allow her to see numbers above a person’s forehead, which she soon discovers are death dates. She identifies the death date of a young boy, but is unable to prevent his disappearance. Then , Maddie becomes a suspect in a homicide investigation.”

10. Suicide Notes from Beautiful Girls by Lynn Weingarten

” June and Delia were best friends who grew apart. Then, Delia commits suicide. Or, at least that’s what others have been told. June believes her former best friend has been murdered, and she goes on a quest to find the truth…which, it turns out, is very complicated.”

 

The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak Celebrates 10th Anniversary March 8, 2016

Filed under: Books,Uncategorized — Heather @ 6:31 pm
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It’s hard to believe it’s been TEN YEARS since the publication of Marcus Zusak’s modern classic The Book Thief. This is the book that took 2006 by storm.

book thief cover

Here are just some of the honors awarded:

  • 2006: Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best Book (South East Asia & South Pacific)
  • 2006: School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
  • 2006: Daniel Elliott Peace Award
  • 2006: Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Book of the Year
  • 2006: National Jewish Book Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature
  • 2006: Bulletin Blue Ribbon Book
  • 2007: Michael L. Printz Honor Book The Printz award is given to the best book for teens, based only on the quality of the writing.
  • 2007: Book Sense Book of the Year Award for Children’s Literature

If you’ve never read it – here’s your chance. If, like me, it’s one of your favorites, pick it up and revisit some old friends. Set in Nazi Germany, The Book Thief tells the story of young Liesl Meminger, orphaned and sent to live with Hans and Rosa Hubermann. Liesl loves books and becomes adept at stealing them, even though she can’t read. Follow Liesl, her best friend Rudy Steiner, as they navigate the dangerous war years. Narrated by the ever-present Death, The Book Thief is a story that stays with you long after the pages have turned.

 

 

Memorial Day Reads May 27, 2014

This Monday, May 27th we honored those that gave the ultimate sacrifice for our country.  In keeping with the patriotic theme, here are some titles that highlight the sacrifice of service, past and future.

Torn by David Massey

“Witnesses to a mystery on the battlefield, a British medic and an American Navy SEAL confront Afghanistan’s fog of war.

In war-torn Afghanistan, a girl walks right into a hail of bullets: Elinor watches it with her own eyes. The young British army medic risks the line of fire to rescue her, only to realize the girl is gone. 

To find the missing, mysterious child, Elinor enlists the help of an American Navy SEAL. But in all the confusion, with coalition troops fighting every day to maintain a fragile peace, does Ben have something to hide? 

Elinor came to Afghanistan with the hope of changing hearts and minds: What she’s about to discover will make her question everything she ever believed about love and war.

A war thriller. A cross-cultural love story with an undercurrent of magic realism. A powerful debut set in modern-day, battle-scarred Afghanistan. This is TORN.”

Vietnam Book 1:  I Pledge Allegiance by Chris Lynch

Four best friends. Four ways to serve their country.

Morris, Rudi, Ivan, and Beck are best friends for life. So when one of the teens is drafted into the Vietnam War, the others sign up, too. Although they each serve in a different branch, they are fighting the war together–and they pledge to do all they can to come home together.

Haunted by dreams of violence and death, Morris makes it his personal mission to watch over his friends–and the best place to do that is in the US Navy. Stationed off the coast of Vietnam on the USS Boston, Morris and his fellow sailors provide crucial support to the troops on the ground.

But the Boston itself isn’t safe from attack. And as Morris finds his courage and resolve tested like never before, he keeps coming back to a single thought.

He made a pledge. He must keep them safe.”

The Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

“A fourth-generation German-American now living in easy circumstances on Cape Cod (and smoking too much), who, as an American infantry scout hors de combat, as a prisoner of war, witnessed the fire-bombing of Dresden, Germany, “The Florence of the Elbe,” a long time ago, and survived to tell the tale. This is a novel somewhat in the telegraphic schizophrenic manner of tales of the planet Tralfamadore, where the flying saucers come from. Peace.

Billy Pilgrim returns home from the Second World War only to be kidnapped by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore, who teach him that time is an eternal present.”

The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane

“The finest novel of the Civil War, and one of the greatest battle stories ever told

The question of courage enters Henry Fleming’s mind the moment he dons the blue uniform of the Union Army. But his first firefight reveals the emptiness of words such as bravery and fear. Pinned in by his comrades, he can only fire his rifle like a cog in a machine. There is no chance to run.

Then comes the true test. Waking from a nap, Henry sees the enemy advancing once again. Gripped by an unshakable terror, he flees—from his regiment, from duty, from everything he wanted to believe about himself. A corpse bears witness to his shame.

The nightmare has come true. Henry Fleming is a coward. Only one thing can save him now: a visible wound, the red badge of courage. With his regiment’s colors in hand, Henry looks the enemy in the eye—and charges.”

Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson

“If an entire nation could seek its freedom, why not a girl? 

As the Revolutionary War begins, thirteen-year-old Isabel wages her own fight…for freedom. Promised freedom upon the death of their owner, she and her sister, Ruth, in a cruel twist of fate become the property of a malicious New York City couple, the Locktons, who have no sympathy for the American Revolution and even less for Ruth and Isabel. When Isabel meets Curzon, a slave with ties to the Patriots, he encourages her to spy on her owners, who know details of British plans for invasion. She is reluctant at first, but when the unthinkable happens to Ruth, Isabel realizes her loyalty is available to the bidder who can provide her with freedom. “

 

2013 Teens’ Top Ten October 28, 2013

Filed under: Books — Heather @ 3:27 pm
Tags: ,

” The Teens’ Top Ten is a ‘teen choice’ list, where teens nominate and choose their favorite books of the previous year! Nominators are members of teen book groups in sixteen school and public libraries around the country. Nominations are posted on Celebrate Teen Literature Day, the Thursday of National Library Week in April, and teens across the country vote on their favorite titles each year.

You have voted and the results are in.  Without further ado, I present the 2013 Teens’ Top Ten winners:

1.  Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

codenameverity“I have two weeks. You’ll shoot me at the end no matter what I do.

That’s what you do to enemy agents. It’s what we do to enemy agents. But I look at all the dark and twisted roads ahead and cooperation is the easy way out. Possibly the only way out for a girl caught red-handed doing dirty work like mine — and I will do anything, anything, to avoid SS-Hauptsturmführer von Linden interrogating me again.

He has said that I can have as much paper as I need. All I have to do is cough up everything I can remember about the British War Effort. And I’m going to. But the story of how I came to be here starts with my friend Maddie. She is the pilot who flew me into France — an Allied Invasion of Two.”

2.  The False Prince by Jennifer A. Nielsen

falseprince“In a discontent kingdom, civil war is brewing. To unify the divided people, Conner, a nobleman of the court, devises a cunning plan to find an impersonator of the king’s long-lost son and install him as a puppet prince. Four orphans are recruited to compete for the role, including a defiant boy named Sage. Sage knows that Conner’s motives are more than questionable, yet his life balances on a sword’s point — he must be chosen to play the prince or he will certainly be killed. But Sage’s rivals have their own agendas as well.

As Sage moves from a rundown orphanage to Conner’s sumptuous palace, layer upon layer of treachery and deceit unfold, until finally, a truth is revealed that, in the end, may very well prove more dangerous than all of the lies taken together.

An extraordinary adventure filled with danger and action, lies and deadly truths that will have readers clinging to the edge of their seats.”

3.  Insurgent by Veronica Roth

insurgent book“One choice can transform you, or destroy you.

Every choice has consequences, and as unrest surges in the factions all around her, Tris Prior must continue trying to save those she loves, and herself, while grappling with haunting questions of grief and forgiveness, identity and loyalty, politics and love.”

4.  Pushing the Limits by Katie McGarry

pushing the limits“No one knows what happened the night Echo Emerson went from popular girl with jock boyfriend to gossiped-about outsider with freaky scars on her arms. Even Echo can’t remember the whole truth of that horrible night. All she knows is that she wants everything to go back to normal.

But when Noah Hutchins, the smoking-hot, girl-using loner in the black leather jacket, explodes into her life with his tough attitude and surprising understanding, Echo’s world shifts in ways she could never have imagined. They should have nothing in common. And with the secrets they both keep, being together is pretty much impossible.

Yet the crazy attraction between them refuses to go away. And Echo has to ask herself just how far they can push the limits and what she’ll risk for the one guy who might teach her how to love again.”

5.  Poison Princess by Kresley Cole

Poison-Princess-183x300She could save the world—or destroy it.

Sixteen-year-old Evangeline “Evie” Greene leads a charmed life, until she begins experiencing horrifying hallucinations. When an apocalyptic event decimates her Louisiana hometown, Evie realizes her hallucinations were actually visions of the future—and they’re still happening. Fighting for her life and desperate for answers, she must turn to her wrong-side-of-the-bayou classmate: Jack Deveaux.

But she can’t do either alone.

With his mile-long rap sheet, wicked grin, and bad attitude, Jack is like no boy Evie has ever known. Even though he once scorned her and everything she represented, he agrees to protect Evie on her quest. She knows she can’t totally depend on Jack. If he ever cast that wicked grin her way, could she possibly resist him?

Who can Evie trust?

As Jack and Evie race to find the source of her visions, they meet others who have gotten the same call. An ancient prophesy is being played out, and Evie is not the only one with special powers. A group of twenty-two teens has been chosen to reenact the ultimate battle between good and evil. But it’s not always clear who is on which side.”

6.  The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

raven boys“There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.”

7.  Crewel by Gennifer Albin

crewel book“Incapable. Awkward. Artless.
That’s what the other girls whisper behind her back. But sixteen-year-old Adelice Lewys has a secret: She wants to fail.

Gifted with the ability to weave time with matter, she’s exactly what the Guild is looking for, and in the world of Arras, being chosen to work the looms is everything a girl could want. It means privilege, eternal beauty, and being something other than a secretary. It also means the power to manipulate the very fabric of reality. But if controlling what people eat, where they live, and how many children they have is the price of having it all, Adelice isn’t interested.

Not that her feelings matter, because she slipped and used her hidden talent for a moment. Now she has one hour to eat her mom’s overcooked pot roast. One hour to listen to her sister’s academy gossip and laugh at her dad’s jokes. One hour to pretend everything’s okay. And one hour to escape.

Because tonight, they’ll come for her.”

8.  Every Day by David Levithan

every day book“Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.”

9.  Kill Me Softly by Sarah Cross

kill me softly“Mirabelle’s past is shrouded in secrecy, from her parents’ tragic deaths to her guardians’ half-truths about why she can’t return to her birthplace, Beau Rivage. Desperate to see the town, Mira runs away a week before her sixteenth birthday—and discovers a world she never could have imagined.

In Beau Rivage, nothing is what it seems—the strangely pale girl with a morbid interest in apples, the obnoxious playboy who’s a beast to everyone he meets, and the chivalrous guy who has a thing for damsels in distress. Here, fairy tales come to life, curses are awakened, and ancient stories are played out again and again.

But fairy tales aren’t pretty things, and they don’t always end in happily ever after. Mira has a role to play, a fairy tale destiny to embrace or resist. As she struggles to take control of her fate, Mira is drawn into the lives of two brothers with fairy tale curses of their own . . . brothers who share a dark secret. And she’ll find that love, just like fairy tales, can have sharp edges and hidden thorns.”

10.  Butter by Erin Jade Lange

butter book“A lonely obese boy everyone calls “Butter” is about to make history. He is going to eat himself to death-live on the Internet-and everyone is invited to watch. When he first makes the announcement online to his classmates, Butter expects pity, insults, and possibly sheer indifference. What he gets are morbid cheerleaders rallying around his deadly plan. Yet as their dark encouragement grows, it begins to feel a lot like popularity. And that feels good. But what happens when Butter reaches his suicide deadline? Can he live with the fallout if he doesn’t go through with his plans?”

For more details, check out the YALSA website:

http://www.ala.org/yalsa/2013-teens-top-ten

 

Zombie Fiction – Not Dead Yet October 22, 2013

Filed under: Books,Movies & TV — Heather @ 10:05 pm
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Zombies are more popular than ever.  Screen adaptations of novels like World War Z along with classic mash-ups like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies have extended the life on this monster genre, perhaps outlasting the vampire craze.

In the sprit of Halloween and riding the coat-tails of Zombie pop-culture popularity, I proudly present my top  titles featuring the un-dead.

5.  Zombie Blondes by Brian James

zombie blondes

 “From the moment Hannah Sanders arrived in town, she felt there was something wrong.  A lot of houses were for sale, and the town seemed infected by an unearthly quiet. And then, on Hannah’s first day of classes, she ran into a group of cheerleaders—the most popular girls in school.  The odd thing was that they were nearly identical in appearance: blonde, beautiful, and deathly pale.  But Hannah wants desperately to fit in—regardless of what her friend Lukas is telling her: If she doesn’t watch her back, she’s going to be blonde and popular and dead—just like all the other zombies in this town. . . .”

4.  Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion

warm bodies book

“R is having a no-life crisis—he is a zombie. He has no memories, no identity, and no pulse, but he is a little different from his fellow Dead. He may occasionally eat people, but he’d rather be riding abandoned airport escalators, listening to Sinatra in the cozy 747 he calls home, or collecting souvenirs from the ruins of civilization.

And then he meets a girl.

First as his captive, then his reluctant house guest, Julie is a blast of living color in R’s gray landscape, and something inside him begins to bloom. He doesn’t want to eat this girl—although she looks delicious—he wants to protect her. But their unlikely bond will cause ripples they can’t imagine, and their hopeless world won’t change without a fight.”

3.  The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman

the walking dead

“The world we knew is gone. The world of commerce and frivolous necessity has been replaced by a world of survival and responsibility. An epidemic of apocalyptic proportions has swept the globe, causing the dead to rise and feed on the living. In a matter of months society has crumbled: no government, no grocery stores, no mail delivery, no cable TV. In a world ruled by the dead, the survivors are forced to finally start living”

2.  Zombies Hate Stuff by Greg Stones

zombies hate stuff

“Zombies hate clowns. They also hate hippies, not to mention zip-lines, penguins, moon penguins, nudists, weddings, sharing, and kittens. They really hate unicorns, and strangely don’t mind Canadians. Each ghoulishly colorful painting reveals a funny and unexpected scene of zombie disgruntlement, cataloging the stuff that really riles up the walking dead (astronauts, rain, bagpipes, re-gifting, and more) with wit, humor, and, of course, brains. Zombies Hate Stuff offers an unexpected and irresistible perspective on the zombie apocalypse and the pop culture phenomenon that will not die.”

1.  Apocalypse Cow by Michael Logan

apocalypse cow

“If you think you’ve seen it all — WORLD WAR Z, THE WALKING DEAD– you haven’t seen anything like this. From the twisted brain of Michael Logan comes Apocalypse Cow, a story about three unlikely heroes who must save Britain . . . from a rampaging horde of ZOMBIE COWS!

Forget the cud. They want blood.

It began with a cow that just wouldn’t die. It would become an epidemic that transformed Britain’s livestock into sneezing, slavering, flesh-craving four-legged zombies.

And if that wasn’t bad enough, the fate of the nation seems to rest on the shoulders of three unlikely heroes: an abattoir worker whose love life is non-existent thanks to the stench of death that clings to him, a teenage vegan with eczema and a weird crush on his maths teacher, and an inept journalist who wouldn’t recognize a scoop if she tripped over one.

As the nation descends into chaos, can they pool their resources, unlock a cure, and save the world?

Three losers.

Overwhelming odds.

One outcome . . .

Yup, we’re screwed.”